Norwich Baroque

Programmes Press and Postludes

28th May 2011-Baroque Concertos for Bassoon and Recorder

"BURIED TREASURE" - BAROQUE CONCERTOS FOR BASSOON AND RECORDER

Noverre Ballroom, Norwich Assembly House.

SOLOISTS : Katriina Boosey - recorder, Frances Eustace - bassoon

DIRECTOR : Jim o`Toole


PROGRAMME:

Concerto Grosso No. 5 in D major - Locatelli
Concerto no.3 for sixth little flute - Babell
Concerto for bassoon in B flat major - Capel Bond

Concerto in 7 parts no.2 in B flat Major - Wassenaer
Concerto in F major for recorder and bassoon - Telemann
Concerto in 7 parts after Scarlatti, no.9 in C major - Avison

Encore - 1st movement of Concerto for strings RV 168 in B minor - Vivaldi



Eastern Daily Press review :

SOME REAL NUGGETS UNEARTHED IN A NIGHT OF BURIED TREASURE

Sweet-toned, alternately brisk and more reflective, and often echoing phrases more gently, Norwich Baroque, led by the lively violinist James O`Toole, created a charming evening of gentle musical entertainment. As the title - "Buried Treasure"- promised, the programme presented a number of unfamiliar compositions that have only recently been unearthed.

One was by William Babell, who worked in both the theatres and churches of George I's London. Another was by Capel Bond, an organist active in the Midlands later in the 18th century.

The imposingly named Count Unico Wilhelm van Wassenaer was a distinguished Dutch diplomat. He wrote music in his spare time , and it was a pleasure to discover that he had ideas of his own.

Wind instruments sometimes added spice to the strings. The Finnish Katriina Boosey was dazzlingly agile in a concerto for the so-called sixth flute, a descant recorder in D. It contrasted with the lower pitch and far darker tone of the Baroque bassoon played by Frances Eustace.

A Telemann concerto provided a rare opportuity of hearing the bassoon together with the recorder, a treble this time. Even more unusual was the rustic sound of the Breughel bagpipes with which Frances Eustace summoned the audience back after the interval.

Christopher Smith.